Loading...

Messages

Proposals

Stuck in your homework and missing deadline? Get urgent help in $10/Page with 24 hours deadline

Get Urgent Writing Help In Your Essays, Assignments, Homeworks, Dissertation, Thesis Or Coursework & Achieve A+ Grades.

Privacy Guaranteed - 100% Plagiarism Free Writing - Free Turnitin Report - Professional And Experienced Writers - 24/7 Online Support

You can grow your intelligence answers

06/01/2021 Client: saad24vbs Deadline: 3 days

(available at http://www.nais.org/Magazines-Newsletters/ISMagazine/Pages/Brainology.aspx)


Brainology

Transforming Students’ Motivation to Learn

Carol S. Dweck


Winter 2008


Page Content


This is an exciting time for our brains. More and more research is showing that our brains change constantly with learning and experience and that this takes place throughout our lives.


Does this have implications for students' motivation and learning? It certainly does. In my research in collaboration with my graduate students, we have shown that what students believe about their brains — whether they see their intelligence as something that's fixed or something that can grow and change — has profound effects on their motivation, learning, and school achievement (Dweck, 2006). These different beliefs, or mindsets, create different psychological worlds: one in which students are afraid of challenges and devastated by setbacks, and one in which students relish challenges and are resilient in the face of setbacks.


How do these mindsets work? How are the mindsets communicated to students? And, most important, can they be changed? As we answer these questions, you will understand why so many students do not achieve to their potential, why so many bright students stop working when school becomes challenging, and why stereotypes have such profound effects on students' achievement. You will also learn how praise can have a negative effect on students' mindsets, harming their motivation to learn.


Mindsets and Achievement Many students believe that intelligence is fixed, that each person has a certain amount and that's that. We call this a fixed mindset, and, as you will see, students with this mindset worry about how much of this fixed intelligence they possess. A fixed mindset makes challenges threatening for students (because they believe that their fixed ability may not be up to the task) and it makes mistakes and failures demoralizing (because they believe that such setbacks reflect badly on their level of fixed intelligence).


It is the belief that intelligence can be developed that opens students to a love of learning, a belief in the power of effort and constructive, determined reactions to setbacks.


Other students believe that intelligence is something that can be cultivated through effort and education. They don't necessarily believe that everyone has the same abilities or that anyone can be as smart as Einstein, but they do believe that everyone can improve their abilities. And they understand that even Einstein wasn't Einstein until he put in years of focused hard work. In short, students with this growth mindset believe that intelligence is a potential that can be realized through learning. As a result, confronting challenges, profiting from mistakes, and persevering in the face of setbacks become ways of getting smarter.


To understand the different worlds these mindsets create, we followed several hundred students across a difficult school transition — the transition to seventh grade. This is when the academic work often gets much harder, the grading gets stricter, and the school environment gets less personalized with students moving from class to class. As the students entered seventh grade, we measured their mindsets (along with a number of other things) and then we monitored their grades over the next two years.


The first thing we found was that students with different mindsets cared about different things in school. Those with a growth mindset were much more interested in learning than in just looking smart in school. This was not the case for students with a fixed mindset. In fact, in many of our studies with students from preschool age to college age, we find that students with a fixed mindset care so much about how smart they will appear that they often reject learning opportunities — even ones that are critical to their success (Cimpian, et al., 2007; Hong, et al., 1999; Nussbaum and Dweck, 2008; Mangels, et al., 2006).


Next, we found that students with the two mindsets had radically different beliefs about effort. Those with a growth mindset had a very straightforward (and correct) idea of effort — the idea that the harder you work, the more your ability will grow and that even geniuses have had to work hard for their accomplishments. In contrast, the students with the fixed mindset believed that if you worked hard it meant that you didn't have ability, and that things would just come naturally to you if you did. This means that every time something is hard for them and requires effort, it's both a threat and a bind. If they work hard at it that means that they aren't good at it, but if they don't work hard they won't do well. Clearly, since just about every worthwhile pursuit involves effort over a long period of time, this is a potentially crippling belief, not only in school but also in life.


Students with different mindsets also had very different reactions to setbacks. Those with growth mindsets reported that, after a setback in school, they would simply study more or study differently the next time. But those with fixed mindsets were more likely to say that they would feel dumb, study less the next time, and seriously consider cheating. If you feel dumb — permanently dumb — in an academic area, there is no good way to bounce back and be successful in the future. In a growth mindset, however, you can make a plan of positive action that can remedy a deficiency. (Hong. et al., 1999; Nussbaum and Dweck, 2008; Heyman, et al., 1992)


Finally, when we looked at the math grades they went on to earn, we found that the students with a growth mindset had pulled ahead. Although both groups had started seventh grade with equivalent achievement test scores, a growth mindset quickly propelled students ahead of their fixed-mindset peers, and this gap only increased over the two years of the study.


In short, the belief that intelligence is fixed dampened students' motivation to learn, made them afraid of effort, and made them want to quit after a setback. This is why so many bright students stop working when school becomes hard. Many bright students find grade school easy and coast to success early on. But later on, when they are challenged, they struggle. They don't want to make mistakes and feel dumb — and, most of all, they don't want to work hard and feel dumb. So they simply retire.


It is the belief that intelligence can be developed that opens students to a love of learning, a belief in the power of effort and constructive, determined reactions to setbacks.


How Do Students Learn These Mindsets? In the 1990s, parents and schools decided that the most important thing for kids to have was self-esteem. If children felt good about themselves, people believed, they would be set for life. In some quarters, self-esteem in math seemed to become more important than knowing math, and self-esteem in English seemed to become more important than reading and writing. But the biggest mistake was the belief that you could simply hand children self-esteem by telling them how smart and talented they are. Even though this is such an intuitively appealing idea, and even though it was exceedingly well-intentioned, I believe it has had disastrous effects.


In the 1990s, we took a poll among parents and found that almost 85 percent endorsed the notion that it was necessary to praise their children's abilities to give them confidence and help them achieve. Their children are now in the workforce and we are told that young workers cannot last through the day without being propped up by praise, rewards, and recognition. Coaches are asking me where all the coachable athletes have gone. Parents ask me why their children won't work hard in school.


Could all of this come from well-meant praise? Well, we were suspicious of the praise movement at the time. We had already seen in our research that it was the most vulnerable children who were already obsessed with their intelligence and chronically worried about how smart they were. What if praising intelligence made all children concerned about their intelligence? This kind of praise might tell them that having high intelligence and talent is the most important thing and is what makes you valuable. It might tell them that intelligence is just something you have and not something you develop. It might deny the role of effort and dedication in achievement. In short, it might promote a fixed mindset with all of its vulnerabilities.

Homework is Completed By:

Writer Writer Name Amount Client Comments & Rating
Instant Homework Helper

ONLINE

Instant Homework Helper

$36

She helped me in last minute in a very reasonable price. She is a lifesaver, I got A+ grade in my homework, I will surely hire her again for my next assignments, Thumbs Up!

Order & Get This Solution Within 3 Hours in $25/Page

Custom Original Solution And Get A+ Grades

  • 100% Plagiarism Free
  • Proper APA/MLA/Harvard Referencing
  • Delivery in 3 Hours After Placing Order
  • Free Turnitin Report
  • Unlimited Revisions
  • Privacy Guaranteed

Order & Get This Solution Within 6 Hours in $20/Page

Custom Original Solution And Get A+ Grades

  • 100% Plagiarism Free
  • Proper APA/MLA/Harvard Referencing
  • Delivery in 6 Hours After Placing Order
  • Free Turnitin Report
  • Unlimited Revisions
  • Privacy Guaranteed

Order & Get This Solution Within 12 Hours in $15/Page

Custom Original Solution And Get A+ Grades

  • 100% Plagiarism Free
  • Proper APA/MLA/Harvard Referencing
  • Delivery in 12 Hours After Placing Order
  • Free Turnitin Report
  • Unlimited Revisions
  • Privacy Guaranteed

6 writers have sent their proposals to do this homework:

University Coursework Help
Helping Hand
Top Essay Tutor
Writer Writer Name Offer Chat
University Coursework Help

ONLINE

University Coursework Help

Hi dear, I am ready to do your homework in a reasonable price.

$112 Chat With Writer
Helping Hand

ONLINE

Helping Hand

I am an Academic writer with 10 years of experience. As an Academic writer, my aim is to generate unique content without Plagiarism as per the client’s requirements.

$110 Chat With Writer
Top Essay Tutor

ONLINE

Top Essay Tutor

I have more than 12 years of experience in managing online classes, exams, and quizzes on different websites like; Connect, McGraw-Hill, and Blackboard. I always provide a guarantee to my clients for their grades.

$115 Chat With Writer

Let our expert academic writers to help you in achieving a+ grades in your homework, assignment, quiz or exam.

Similar Homework Questions

Mary poppins script free - Hoods play script pdf - Explorations in conceptual chemistry activity 6a answers - Airline Crew Scheduling Problems - Ru school of chinese thought - Three classes of mollusks - Ethical Hacking_Week9 - Alpha chiang pdf - Chem data sheet hsc - Case study - Continuum allen curnow analysis - Saudi arabian monetary agency sama - Cookie project accounting - Are there as many stars as grains of sand - Make a Poster (in Landscape) - Good informative speech topics with visual aid - Test of everyday reading comprehension - First hand data and second hand data - Iron 3 chloride msds - Describe what each letter stands for in the cvp graph - Nova six sigma - 7 primary chakras indian head massage - E Marketing-6 - Dissertation topic in Cybersecurity or Blockchain - Quantitative research on bedside shift report - Diatribe of bilge meaning - Discussion Study 3 - Need help on accounting homework - Why are avocados expensive in australia - Full wave rectifier on breadboard - Kansas city preventive patrol experiment findings - Seeing and writing 4th edition pdf - Accessibility checker word 2011 mac - Bonaire navigator evaporative cooling - NURS-6050N-66/NURS-6050C-66-Policy & Advocacy - NUR340asignmentweek6 - For both companies compute the a current ratio - Archimedes principle lab report discussion - Ned kelly family tree quinn - Hands off doctrine - Which financial statement is more important - Physical changes and aging - Homework solutions fees - What is the electron configuration for ti - Animal farm chapter 8 10 questions and answers - Week 6 Final - Ab inbev investor presentation - Prophetic orientation is a prominent aspect of - Endress hauser fmr57 manual - Hay una silla al lado del escritorio en ingles - Domain model in ooad tutorialspoint - Colognes that make women horny - Human Resources Management week 2 - Ncs the challenge roles - Dialysis cycler travel case - Colourful language persuasive technique - Sociology - Pathophysiology - Under armour goals and objectives - Ruby bridges psychiatrist - Module 9 workbook answers - Co2 dragster design and construction - Se habla espanol by tanya barrientos - CEER - Visa vcf 4.0 file format specification - Mi cable in conduit - A car in an amusement park ride rolls - Vadasz v pioneer concrete - Neutrik speakon nl4fc connector assembly - Discussion Responses - A boy's best friend isaac asimov questions and answers pdf - Www nwlink com donclark hrd sat html - Cherie lunghi nescafe - Easy mender fence post - Why was cyrus considered a fair ruler - Various ways to improve system development productivity - Keperra quarry development brookfield - Weak acid strong base titration curve calculations - Heart i want to make love to you - Shab e furqat meaning in english - Cloud Computing discussion IaaS - Internal architecture of 8051 microcontroller - Babylonian number system converter - Domestic sourcing vs international sourcing - Idols lucky number paradise island - Four angles of quadrilateral are in the ratio - Nursing Project - Homework - What is balanced and unbalanced force - California bearing ratio calculation - Heterogeneity in distributed systems - Your seemingly lofty dream will come true meaning - Pegging currency to gold and guaranteeing convertibility - Wk 1, IOP 480: DISC Assessment and Reflection - Something fishy this way comes - Best practices in outsourcing project work - Label the layers of the earth worksheet - Knowing Your Users Assignment - River city cast 2011 - Muskoskeletal